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The Power to Move Us

Celebrating Railfans, Rail Photographers and our own Kodak Park Railroad History

 

 
 

Featuring railfan photographers: Matthew Stoffel, Phyllis and Keith Hackleman, Aaron Durand, and John Kucko

Now through January 31, 2020

The Gallery at Kodak Center
M-F 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Saturdays 8 a.m.-3 p.m.
Free to the public

 
 

There is something about the rails that draws us in. An allure. A fascination.

Rail power can connect people to places, materials to makers, and products to markets. It can move mountains both literally and figuratively. 

The rails also represent what has been and what lies ahead. Their power has a storied past and a bright future. There is a certain romance to it.

The Kodak Park Railroad is no different. It has a long history of providing the power and potential to fuel one of the largest industrial complexes in the world. 

This exhibit is a tribute to all the main lines and sidings that continue to captivate us.

Explore the history of the Kodak Park Railroad

Also featuring Rail Photographers:

Phyllis and Keith Hackleman: Award-winning and published, this husband and wife photography duo have been train chasing for many years all over the U.S.

Aaron Durand: A railfan photographer from Portland, OR, Aaron Durand shoots medium format film images. His work reflects a variety of different approaches to rail photography, including light trails and graffiti. Aaron has also discovered a unique estate collection of rail images from the early 1900’s. We’re happy to have a selection of these time capsule images and some of Aaron’s personal work on display.

John Kucko: Locally known for his storied career as WROC-TV Sports Anchor for many years, John Kucko has found a love for photographing upstate NY’s most beautiful and interesting places. Trains of our area are one of John’s favorite subjects.

Matt Stoffel: A marketer at Eastman Kodak Company with a love for sharing and storytelling, Matt Stoffel captured imagery to express the here and now of Kodak Park (now Eastman Business Park) and the modern-day use of our rail system. His photos often include hints of the company and are predominantly captured on Kodak film in medium format and 135. Matt is also the director of the Kodak Camera Club.

Organized by the Kodak Camera Club